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20121224
20121224
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
as to whether or not we were following the technology. >> you mean speaking into something and have it automatic to dictate into english? >> well yes but on a more professional level, a particular software application developed. (off mic) >> the best thing is to have an interpreter. >> commissioner kingsley: a real person, absolutely. thank you very much. >> commissioner chan? >> commissioner chan: in terms of the reference to psas, says we are televised, we can educate the public on how to make it was reported you are involved in domestic violence. can you describe what the issues were, and how we can collaboratively address the issue? here is how it works. when there's a problem you go to the department or the commission and we address it. >> one thing that sandra had spoken about in our workshop is that there was an issue where psa may not have known severity of the walk-in who had some type of an issue. prior to me get in there. if you have an issue, and you don't speak, don't leave. the last thing we want to do is have the person leave. if this is impractical emerge
that certainly san francisco sits in the seat of such technological developments that are really evolving and reshaping the world on so many fronts, biotech, biomedical, engineering feats. will could not understand why we could not board and eight with the technology available, state-of-the-art information system. for our citizens. thank you very much. i am very excited. it seems as though we are exponentially improving. i don't expect that we will wait another 10 years for similar reports. i am expecting that certainly within the next year we will be 10 steps further ahead. a few years ago it would've taken longer.
more predictive policing using both data and technology to help us do that. and then, of course, i think the most important part is to organize our communities and work with community-based organizations, families, religious groups, and everybody that's on the ground to find more ways to intervene in violent behavior out there and utilize resources such as education systems, our community jobs programs, others that might allow people to go in different direction. the unfortunate and very tragic incident in connecticut in sandy hook elementary school of course heightened everybody's awareness of what violence can really be all about. and as we have been not only responding, reacting to this national tragedy that i think president obama has adequately described as broken all of our hearts, and in every funeral that has taken place, for those 20 innocent children and six innocent adults in the school districts, and school administrators, we obviously have shared in that very tragic event, all of us. it has touched everybody across this country. san francisco is no different. and i hav
profitable crime. it has attracted participation by organized criminal gangs. innovation and technology has made it possible for the traffickers to recruit their victims. internet has transformed the landscape of human trafficking. the san francisco police department has adopted a victim centered philosophy which prevents victims from being treated like perpetrators. we work closely with advocacy groups such as asian-pacific legal outreach in numerous volunteer specifically trained in helping the victims. partnership with these advocates ensures that the victims have the resources and assistance to rebuild their lives. a -- is a law enforcement tool that allows victims report crimes without fear of deportation. a u visa is a temporary four-year visa. -- has been designated to issue the visa is by reviewing the applicant's background. the final determination is made by the united states customs and immigration service. in 2011, we received 318 requests for u visas. this year we expect to review 994 cases. the special victims unit leads the way setting the standard for best pract
is ted wong with webcor obayashi. we had two engineers being guest lectures at the technology part of tech 21. so they already had their presentations earlier this month. i was going to give you an update on our collective veterans hiring effort. i'm happy to say that we have two of our founding members in the room with us, manny flores and paula ressa of the carpenter's union. back in april we commenced a veteran's hiring steering committee, if you will, to look at issues of veterans geting into the construction field. we subsequently had two working group meetings with alameda workforce investment board, representatives, the edd there, as well as the carpenters' union and city build, as well as mission hiring hall. and what we came up with was essentially we found out that you needed to connect the dots with veterans hiring and a lot of organizations are out there working to support veterans, but nobody is really talking to each other and they are trying to individually reach out to employers and not really in a cohesive fashion. with unions and companies and cbos we needed to d
in a rapid manner. on the technology side we are grappling with how to enhance dispatch. we are working closely with lisa hoffman to have a system that identifies the language skills of bilingual officers immediately and in real-time so that they can be more readily dispatched to the scene and it gives equally important information which is to know if there aren't bilingual officers, waiting on the scene, and can move onto the next level, the language line system. we are working on how do we get officers who want to be bilingual, who want to be certified as bilingual officers, how do they more rapidly get the certification process in place? officers can be certified in mandarin, cantonese, spanish, russian. we are hoping and working with other divisions within the city to get the process moving more quickly. on the street patrol officers, they're using their own cell phones to call language line. on a real level of equipment, officers need a better way to ask his language line. we are working with the department and think outside of the box. bilingual officers use digit
to statistics, though, we did uncover yet another gap as we get better technologically, captain flaherty in preparation for our last meeting with the commission on status of women saw that the stats for db numbers, she felt they were a bit low. she discovered the reporting was for the fiscal year, she got with director giffin and looked at them for the calendar year and indeed they were low. i ordered an immediate audit for all of our numbers and we discovered when we changed over approximately 8,000 police reports hadn't been scanned in for purposes of comstat. that obviously is going to click up our year to date statistics but at least they will be accurate. a lot of these reports were closed cases, warrants, things like that, not necessary of any follow-up but not wanting to risk anything, captain flaherty did an audit of the 106 cases that hadn't been scanned in that would have been svu cases, all had been followed up on, one needed specifically to be assigned and that's been taken so we don't have anything that slipped through the cracks. however, you will notice when you see th
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)